The christian preaching of john wesley

John Wesley was born on the seventeenth of June,in Epworth rectory, England, the fifteenth of nineteen children of Samuel and Susanna Wesley. The father of Wesley [right] was a preacher, and Wesley's mother was a remarkable woman in wisdom and intelligence. She was a woman of deep piety and brought her little ones into close contact with the Bible stories, telling them from the tiles about the nursery fireplace. She also used to dress the children in their best on the days when they were to have the privilege of learning their alphabet as an introduction to the reading of the Holy Scriptures.

The christian preaching of john wesley

But seeing it avails nothing before God to go only thus far, it highly imports us to consider, First. What is implied in being almost, Secondly. What in being altogether, a Christian. Now, in the being almost a Christian is implied, First, heathen honesty. No one, I suppose, will make any question of this; especially, since by heathen honesty here, I mean, not that which is recommended in the writings of their philosophers only, but such as the common heathens expected one of another, and many of them actually practised.

And, accordingly, they not only held him in abomination who was forsworn, who called God to witness to a lie; but him also who was known to be a slanderer of his neighbour, who falsely accused any man. And indeed, little better did they esteem wilful liars of any sort, accounting them the disgrace of human kind, and the pests of society.

They expected whatever assistance any one could give another, without prejudice to himself.

The christian preaching of john wesley

And this they extended not only to those little offices of humanity which are performed without any expense or labour, but likewise to the feeding the hungry, if they had food to spare; the clothing the naked with their own superfluous raiment; and, in general.

Thus far, in the lowest account of it, heathen honesty went; the first thing implied in the being almost a Christian. A second thing implied in the being almost a Christian, is, the having a form of godliness; of that godliness which is prescribed in the gospel of Christ; the having the outside of a real Christian.

Accordingly, the almost Christian does nothing which the gospel forbids. He taketh not the name of God in vain; he blesseth, and curseth not; he sweareth not at all, but his communication is, yea, yea; nay, nay.

He profanes not the day of the Lord, nor suffers it to be profaned, even by the stranger that is within his gates.

He avoids, as much as in him lies, all strife and contention, continually endeavouring to live peaceably with all men.

And, if he suffer wrong, he avengeth not himself, neither returns evil for evil. He does not willingly wrong, hurt, or grieve any man; but in all things act and speaks by that plain rule, "Whatsoever thou wouldest not he should do unto thee, that do not thou to another.

And in doing good, he does not confine himself to cheap and easy offices of kindness, but labours and suffers for the profit of many, that by all means he may help some.

The christian preaching of john wesley

In spite of toil or pain, "whatsoever his hand findeth to do, he doeth it with his might;" whether it be for his friends, or for his enemies; for the evil, or for the good. For being "not slothful" in this, or in any "business," as he "hath opportunity" he doeth "good," all manner of good, "to all men;" and to their souls as well as their bodies.

He reproves the wicked, instructs the ignorant, confirms the wavering, quickens the good, and comforts the afflicted. He labours to awaken those that sleep; to lead those whom God hath already awakened to the "Fountain opened for sin and for uncleanness," that they may wash therein and be clean; and to stir up those who are saved through faith, to adorn the gospel of Christ in all things.

He that hath the form of godliness uses also the means of grace; yea, all of them, and at all opportunities. He constantly frequents the house of God; and that, not as the manner of some is, who come into the presence of the Most High, either loaded with gold and costly apparel, or in all the gaudy vanity of dress, and either by their unseasonable civilities to each other, or the impertinent gaiety of their behaviour, disclaim all pretensions to the form as well as to the power of godliness.

Would to God there were none even among ourselves who fall under the same condemnation! Who come into this house, it may be, gazing about, or with all the signs of the most listless, careless indifference, though sometimes they may seem to use a prayer to God for his blessing on what they are entering upon; who, during that awful service, are either asleep, or reclined in the most convenient posture for it; or, as though they supposed God was asleep, talking with one another, or looking round, as utterly void of employment.

Neither let these be accused of the form of godliness. No; he who has even this, behaves with seriousness and attention, in every part of that solemn service. More especially, when he approaches the table of the Lord, it is not with a light or careless behaviour, but with an air, gesture, and deportment which speaks nothing else but "God be merciful to me a sinner!

To this, if we add the constant use of family prayer, by those who are masters of families, and the setting times apart for private addresses to God, with a daily seriousness of behaviour; he who uniformly practises this outward religion, has the form of godliness.

There needs but one thing more in order to his being almost a Christian, and that is, sincerity. By sincerity I mean, a real, inward principle of religion, from whence these outward actions flow.

And, indeed if we have not this, we have not heathen honesty; no, not so much of it as will answer the demand of a heathen Epicurean poet. Even this poor wretch, in his sober intervals, is able to testify, Oderunt peccare boni, virtutis amore; Oderunt peccare mali, formidine poenae.

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If, then, any man, from the same motive, viz.John Wesley: A Preaching Life vividly portrays the centrality of Wesley's preaching to the religious revival that transformed eighteenth-century England.

Author Bio Michael Pasquarello III, Ph.D. is Granger E. & Anna A. Fisher Professor of Preaching, School of Biblical Interpretation & Proclamation, at Asbury Theological Seminary in Wilmore, KY.

Sermons on Several Occasions is a collection of sermons compiled into five series. In his first series, John Wesley presents what the Bible says concerning the way to heaven.

In his second series, Wesley sheds light on several important Christian doctrines and practices. An Account of the Life of John Wesley Fox's Book of Martyrs. Chapter XX: John Wesley was born on the seventeenth of June, , in Epworth rectory, England, the fifteenth of nineteen children of Samuel and Susanna Wesley.

The father of Wesley [right] was a preacher, and Wesley's mother was a remarkable woman in wisdom and intelligence. Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for The Sermons of John Wesley: A Collection for the Christian Journey at rutadeltambor.com Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users.

The Sermons of John Wesley: A Collection for the Christian Journey [Kenneth J. Collins, Jason E. Vickers] on rutadeltambor.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. A new and engaging collection of sermons that embraces the historic 44 sermons that John Wesley approved/5(15). John Wesley Quotes Page 1 of 8 John Wesley John Wesley was an Anglican cleric and Christian theologian.

Wesley is largely credited, along with his brother Charles Wesley, with founding the Methodist movement which began when he took to open-air preaching in a .

John Wesley Quotes